MATRIXSYNTH: Klaus Schulze KORG PS-3300



Tuesday, March 06, 2007

Klaus Schulze KORG PS-3300

Title link takes you to shots pulled via this auction.

Details:
"Greetings. Well what can I say. You are looking at one of the rarest synthesizers on the planet. A korg PS 3300 prototype owned by the legendary Klaus Schulze of Tangerine Dream. But sadly it does not work so I am selling it as a non working unit. This would be the ultimate restoration project for somebody with technical know-how and time. Not only is this synth mega mega rare but it has a historic valve as well. If this synth could talk it would have many stories to tell. This synth would have been on many world tours with klaus. The synth does power up with lights flashing and blinking. The main control boards seem to work. With a service, 2 out of the 3 blocks will be functional. There are 4 voice boards missing but the can be easily copied with all IC's still available (see photos).

As you can see by the photos, It has seen better days. So you may ask why am I selling such a rare and historic beast? I am getting out of the synth collecting game due to changes in life. I have changed my mind about 3000 times on whether to sell or not. This korg has no serial numbers and even has a spelling mistakes ("modifires", instead of modifiers) (see photo). All the PS 3300's made after this one has a darker face with MS 20 knobs. This PS has a light grey face with very early Maxikorg knobs. Believe me this is a upmost regrettable sale!!! So my loss is definitely your gain. So how did this synth end up in Australia? Klaus sent this synth along some minimoogs to an artist by the name of Mark Sakautzky in south australia many many years ago when digital came onto the scene. It was then purchased by David James a collector in sydney about ten years ago. Then I purchased it about 4 years ago when Dave James sold his collection. My intention was restore it. I am hoping that this synth will go to a good home that is why I am willing to pay half the shipping costs worldwide."

Note the typos for the word "Modifiers" spelled "Modifires" via Matt and Aeonian on the AH list.

16 comments:

  1. Looks like serious trouble to me.

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  2. duplicating those cards would hardly be as simple as he states. voice cards use epoxied Korg ICs

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  3. Don't be so hard on the guy. He got laid off from his job at the used car lot! ;)

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  4. What's with the wave of rare, "non-working" synths on ebay recently?

    Hey, you know what, fuck 'playing' synths, let's all shell out the big bucks so we can just 'stare' at synths...much easier on the fingers.

    Anybody really cares if it was owned by someone famous? Personnally, I think it'S irrelevant, unless major changes were made on it, like with a lot of Kraftwerk gear for instance.

    This collection of destroyed patch cables were used by Keith Emerson...

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  5. Typical synth collector BS, this. Doesn't work, yet we're pushed by this clown to get it because it's 'famous' and 'rare'. Might appeal to someone of a similarly defective mindset, but this thing's shouldn't even be worth the shipping cost to a working musician with any sense. I can't think of any techs that would even touch it, given the proprietal IC issues and the prototype nature of it. Restoring it would probably be near-impossible; at the very least you could find a working non-proto, non-historic PS3300 on the broker market for the five figures you'd sink into this. Ahhh, but the lights DO blink and flash on it, so it must be k00l, right? After all, everyone's got $7500+ to drop on blinky lights and knobs that don't do anything.

    Pft. Fools, money, soon parted, all that.

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  6. Typical synth collector BS, this. Doesn't work, yet we're pushed by this clown to get it because it's 'famous' and 'rare'. Might appeal to someone of a similarly defective mindset, but this thing's shouldn't even be worth the shipping cost to a working musician with any sense. I can't think of any techs that would even touch it, given the proprietal IC issues and the prototype nature of it. Restoring it would probably be near-impossible; at the very least you could find a working non-proto, non-historic PS3300 on the broker market for the five figures you'd sink into this. Ahhh, but the lights DO blink and flash on it, so it must be k00l, right? After all, everyone's got $7500+ to drop on blinky lights and knobs that don't do anything.

    Pft. Fools, money, soon parted, all that.

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  7. believe it or not there are humans on this earth who don't play music and like to collect synth memorobilia.....
    no they aren't crazy.....
    yes, some of them do have lots of money....

    i don't see the problem here....
    go annoy a stamp collector or something...those guys shell out the thousands for paper....friggen paper dude! and small square ones at that!

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  8. But isn't the Japenglish MODIFIRES worth it all? And how about this 'Rare Valve' he talks about? Whats that? Is it that famous Theremin Valve that KORG ripped off in the 1930s?

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  9. From one thing to another, the 6 extra large silvery knobs on the face panel are probably not original. Klaus Schulze's PS-3300 doesn't appear to have had them (at least not in any of the vintage pics I've seen). The PS-3300 pictured in Mark Vail's book "Vintage Synthesizers" (which might be the very same instrument?)doesn't have the extra large knobs either.
    Also, the knobs are not the same type as used with the Maxikorg but the same as used on the Korg 770.

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  10. im still waiting for a japanese synth that says "enveRope" on it...
    :)

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  11. Enverope was on the first run of Roland PG-200 programmers.

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  12. ignorant fools. if not for musicians there would not be music. right? and if not for vintage synth collectors, synth designers and synth techs, many would have died away only to be replaced by virtual synths. try to give credit to anyone that has any positive interest and influence in electronic music which contributes to it's longetivity. you guys probably spend your time wanking in front of your computers instead of contributing to the real world. ;)

    ReplyDelete
  13. Klaus smoked like a chimney.
    I'm sure this Korg saw a lot.

    Anon, you are completely right.
    This blog is made by a guy with a corporate day job.
    Nothing here for pros or from pros.
    Amateur hour wankathon all the way.

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  14. "Amateur hour wankathon all the way. "

    Not all the way, but definitely most of the way. That's the net for you. Most people worth a damn don't have time to blab on these boards. The rest post anonymous comments. ;) REALLY. Opinionated haters, you need to find somewhere else to rest between jerkin it to gear porn. Watch TV or something. Cause the world does not want to hear you. :)

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  15. Right with the haters? The seller's being up-front about the condition, and if some buyer wants to fetishize it why the begrudge him that? Even if doesn't work or actually owned by the TD dude, it's a pretty f'n cool doorstop!

    I once visited a private collection that would make your synth-loving heads spin, and much of it was in disrepair. It was a little sad, but just beholding an ARP modular prototype was a pretty amazing thing.

    Point is, while I'd rather have a working Evolver or Moog, it's good that someone cares enough about this stuff.

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  16. All of these same statements could be made about Moog modulars. If a person can't see a reason for the value or desireability, then any price seems pointless.
    The PS-3300 is the most powerful non-digital analog of all time, and is very highly desired by professional analog synth enthusiasts. If this synth had started without a starting bid, and was at least close to fully functional, I would not have been surprised at all if it would have approached the stated starting price.
    The Korg PS series, as far as I know, has neither proprietary parts, nor is epoxied.
    Expecting voice cards to be home made is very unrealistic, though... I have to agree. This particular synth is not worth that starting price as a result of what it is missing, but many of these comments seem directed at the synth IN GENERAL, and not on the shortcomings of this particular synth. If this synth was just non-functioning, and had all of its parts intact, it would still be a good investment.
    If you have no understanding of why vintage instruments are sought after by professional musicians, and if you have no knowledge regarding why certain vintage synths are historically relevant, perhaps you should stick to your MS-2000 and choose to comment where your stance has any merit.

    ReplyDelete

Comments are moderated. Constructive feedback on gear is welcome, insulting people is not.

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