MATRIXSYNTH: COMPOSE | DECOMPOSE Conversation: Eleanor Annand + Make Noise Featuring Synthesizer for Two Coasts

Monday, March 25, 2019

COMPOSE | DECOMPOSE Conversation: Eleanor Annand + Make Noise Featuring Synthesizer for Two Coasts


via Penland Gallery

Mixed-media sculpture and sound installations
March 26 – May 12, 2019
Reception: Saturday March 30, 4:40-6:30PM | Make Noise modular synthesizer performances by Walker Farrell, Meg Mulhearn, and Jake Pugh

"For Compose | Decompose, the fourth installment in the Penland Gallery’s Conversation series, Annand proposed showing her work alongside the instruments and music of Make Noise. Their conversation is about exploration within defined systems. Annand makes modular sculptural elements from cardboard and cast paper; Make Noise makes modular systems for electronic music composition. In both cases modularity is not about creating predictability, it’s about providing a framework in which to cast expression and, sometimes, disruption. In works like Entropic, Annand avoids the purity of mathematical tessellations. She opts to create arrangements that contain disorder, making them analogous to human lives in their unpredictability and the possibility of playfulness within constrained systems. Make Noise takes this concept further with Synthesizer for Two Coasts, a conceptual instrument that only plays Bach’s Invention No. 4 in D minor. However, even within this narrow scope the user can find expression by manipulating timbre and injecting random notes into the music. Their systems are not designed for traditional composition, but for the 'discovery of unfound sound.'"

Check out MAKE NOISE's Synthesizer for Two Coasts here.

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