MATRIXSYNTH: オリジナル曲「LONELY RIDER」 Fujitsu FM77AV Version

Wednesday, March 25, 2020

オリジナル曲「LONELY RIDER」 Fujitsu FM77AV Version


Published on Mar 25, 2020 NozMusic

"2014年10月に発表したオリジナル曲「LONELY RIDER」を、2020年3月にFujitsuパソコンFM77AVでリメイクしました。
音楽制作にあたり、標準のF-BASICをOH!FMの拡張PLAY文「EDPLAY」に拡張しました。
これにより、自作音色を自由に切り替える事ができまして、貴重なFM音源3音を有効活用出来ました。
PSG音源も、ソフトエンベロープが追加されてるので、エンベロープを切り換えながら演奏させてます。
更にパートデチューンも使えるので、PSG音源2音を重ねてコーラス感あるサウンドを作れます。
32年ぶりにFM77AVでMMLを打ちましたけど、まだまだ出来るものですね♪"

Googlish:

"The original song 'LONELY RIDER' announced in October 2014 was remade in March 2020 with the Fujitsu PC FM77AV.
For music production, the standard F-BASIC has been extended to OH! FM's extended PLAY statement 'EDPLAY'.
This made it possible to freely switch between self-made sounds, and effectively used three precious FM sound sources.

The PSG sound source also has a soft envelope added, so we play while switching the envelope.
In addition, part detune can be used, so you can create a chorus-like sound by layering two PSG sound sources.
I wrote MML with FM77AV for the first time in 32 years, but I can still do it ♪"


via Wikipedia:

"The FM-7 ('Fujitsu Micro 7') is a home computer created by Fujitsu. It was first released in 1982 and was sold in Japan and Spain. It is a stripped-down version of Fujitsu's earlier FM-8 computer, and during development it was referred to as the 'FM-8 Jr.'.

Although it was designed to be a cut-down version of the FM-8, most notably removing the (expensive) bubble memory technology, the FM-7 was given a more advanced AY-3-8910 sound chip capable of three voice sound synthesis, leading to a strong uptake among the hobbyist computer market in Japan and making it a more popular system than the FM-8."

And via Wikipedia here:

"The AY-3-8910 is a 3-voice programmable sound generator (PSG) designed by General Instrument in 1978, initially for use with their 16-bit CP1610 or one of the PIC1650 series of 8-bit microcomputers. The AY-3-8910 and its variants were used in many arcade games—Konami's Gyruss contains five[1]—and pinball machines as well as being the sound chip in the Intellivision and Vectrex video game consoles, and the Amstrad CPC, Oric-1, Colour Genie, Elektor TV Games Computer, MSX, and later ZX Spectrum home computers. It was also used in the Mockingboard and Cricket sound cards for the Apple II and the Speech/Sound Cartridge[2] for the TRS-80 Color Computer."

1 comment:

  1. Very nice, but I would rather have an Apple ][gs, which has the Ensoniq DOC.

    ReplyDelete

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