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Showing posts sorted by date for query The Synth Shed. Sort by relevance Show all posts

Saturday, June 01, 2024

Intellijel Cascadia: patching Ring Mod into FX loop with Chroma Console


video uploads by The Synth Shed

Playlist:

1. Intellijel Cascadia sound demo with Vector Five12 sequencer (no talking)
Sound demo showing how to set up a basic patch and modulations (based on some of the start-up examples in the manual) - with CV pitch/gate controlled through the amazing Five12 Vector Sequencer to give us a driving techno line with lots of dirt.

side-note: I don't know if I was hallucinating after too much coffee, but by the end I thought the melody had morphed into the Star Wars Imperial March. WELCOME TO THE DARK SIDE!
2. Intellijel Cascadia: patching Ring Mod into FX loop with Chroma Console
Fourth part of my initial Cascadia explorations, again using the Chroma on fx duties, but this time with the added textures created by patching the Cascadia's Ring Modulator into the FX loop. Tasty sounds!
3. Intellijel Cascadia x Chroma Console = 'Add N to (X)'
Building on the patch and sequence created for my first Cascadia sound demo, we take things further with the addition of the inspiring multi-fx unit Chroma Console from Hologram Electronics. The perfect pairing for creating experimental sounds - and if you slow the tempo you're in instant 'Add N to (X)' chunky synth groove territory. Once again driven by the Five12 Vector Sequencer.
4. Intellijel Cascadia x Chroma Console PART 2: Filthy fuzz bass!
Had so much fun experimenting with this killer combo in the first video, that I ended up recording another video just to show how dang low down and dirty the Cascadia can go with a little help from its friends (in this case, FX from the Chroma and sequencing via the Five12 Vector)

Saturday, January 20, 2024

Discovering the Roland SH1000: Pros, Cons & Famous Users - Dry


video upload by Andy Whitmore

"In this video, we are going to get into the fascinating world of the legendary Roland SH1000 synthesizer. Join us as we explore its extraordinary features, uncover the pros and cons, and even discover some famous users who have embraced this iconic instrument.
Throughout our exploration, we will also shed light on the concept of the SH1000’s 2 Low Frequency Oscillators (LFOs) and how they contribute to the unique sound of the SH1000.
Whether you're a seasoned musician or simply intrigued by the world of synthesizers, this video is sure to provide valuable insights and knowledge.
So, if you're ready to learn more about the history, functionality, and impact of the Roland SH1000, hit that play button and prepare to be amazed! Don't forget to like and share this video with your fellow music enthusiasts. Let's celebrate the brilliance of this timeless synthesizer together.

The SH-1000, introduced in 1973, was the first instrument produced by Roland, and probably one of the first compact affordable keyboard synthesizers in all of Japan. It was designed to complement a home organ. Above its keyboard is a wooden sheet music stand. Organ-style coloured preset selector tabs are located below the keyboard. All the extra parameter controls are located to the left of the keyboard.
The SH-1000 is a monophonic analog synth with a single oscillator feeding a lowpass filter, an ADSR envelope, and two LFOs. It features 10 Preset sounds, but they are pretty weak. Fortunately you can create your own sounds for some really great mono-synth bass, lead, percussion and FX sounds. Basic square, ramp and pulse-width waveforms are available from the oscillator and the LFOs have sine, square and sample+hold. It has a terrific ‘Growl’ and ‘Wow’ effect for a pretty scary analog sound. It also features white noise, pink noise, portamento, octave transposition and a Random Note Generator. Although there is no user memory, unique sounds can still be quickly recreated or discovered thanks to its simple interface.
It’s a dinosaur! But it’s also a classic piece of Roland history. It has been used by Vangelis, Human League, Blondie, The Band, and Jethro Tull. A little later in 1973 the SH2000 was released with more Preset sounds (up to 30) but far less flexibility, controls and features. This may have been because the SH-1000 was a little confusing to its target demographic at the time. But today’s synthesists will love the unique sound and nostalgia of Japan’s first compact synthesizer!

The audio is DIRECT, 100% DRY, & IN STEREO - You are hearing the raw audio as it comes directly from the synthesizer. NO post processing (Effects, EQ, or Dynamics) whatsoever.

Timings

0:00 - Introduction & History
1:06 – Wind, Noise, Modulation, Tremolo
4:35 – Presets
5:27 – Live Panel, Bass Modulation & Tremolo
6:51 – Bass with Glide
7:24 – Imagination “Just an Illusion” Bass
8:40 – Filter Resonance Modulation"

Discovering the Roland SH1000: Pros, Cons & Famous Users


video upload by Andy Whitmore

0:00 - Introduction & History
1:06 – Wind, Noise, Modulation, Tremolo
4:35 – Presets
5:27 – Live Panel, Bass Modulation & Tremolo
6:51 – Bass with Glide
7:24 – Imagination “Just an Illusion” Bass
8:40 – Filter Resonance Modulation

"In this video, we are going to get into the fascinating world of the legendary Roland SH1000 synthesizer. Join us as we explore its extraordinary features, uncover the pros and cons, and even discover some famous users who have embraced this iconic instrument.

Throughout our exploration, we will also shed light on the concept of the SH1000’s 2 Low Frequency Oscillators (LFOs) and how they contribute to the unique sound of the SH1000.

Whether you're a seasoned musician or simply intrigued by the world of synthesizers, this video is sure to provide valuable insights and knowledge.

So, if you're ready to learn more about the history, functionality, and impact of the Roland SH1000, hit that play button and prepare to be amazed! Don't forget to like and share this video with your fellow music enthusiasts. Let's celebrate the brilliance of this timeless synthesizer together.

The SH-1000, introduced in 1973, was the first instrument produced by Roland, and probably one of the first compact affordable keyboard synthesizers in all of Japan. It was designed to complement a home organ. Above its keyboard is a wooden sheet music stand. Organ-style coloured preset selector tabs are located below the keyboard. All the extra parameter controls are located to the left of the keyboard.

The SH-1000 is a monophonic analog synth with a single oscillator feeding a lowpass filter, an ADSR envelope, and two LFOs. It features 10 Preset sounds, but they are pretty weak. Fortunately you can create your own sounds for some really great mono-synth bass, lead, percussion and FX sounds. Basic square, ramp and pulse-width waveforms are available from the oscillator and the LFOs have sine, square and sample+hold. It has a terrific ‘Growl’ and ‘Wow’ effect for a pretty scary analog sound. It also features white noise, pink noise, portamento, octave transposition and a Random Note Generator. Although there is no user memory, unique sounds can still be quickly recreated or discovered thanks to its simple interface.

It’s a dinosaur! But it’s also a classic piece of Roland history. It has been used by Vangelis, Human League, Blondie, The Band, and Jethro Tull. A little later in 1973 the SH2000 was released with more Preset sounds (up to 30) but far less flexibility, controls and features. This may have been because the SH-1000 was a little confusing to its target demographic at the time. But today’s synthesists will love the unique sound and nostalgia of Japan’s first compact synthesizer!

Download Link:-
https://www.dropbox.com/scl/fi/i2a5fe..."

Tuesday, May 02, 2023

Analogue Solutions Colossus Quartz Synthesizer Expanders


video upload by Analogue Solutions



Press release follows:

Analogue Solutions ‘splits’ Colossus AS200 Slim synth into ‘quarters’ to create Colossus AS250 Quartz range of expanders with possible piecemeal purchase

SHATTERFORD, UK: having shed some pounds off its ‘against-all-odds-created’ Colossus AS100 Classic super-synth (that took its inspirational design cues from the colossal classic personified by the rarefied Seventies-vintage Synthi 100, bravely built by British trailblazing entity EMS as one of the largest and most expensive examples ever birthed by anyone anywhere) to create Colossus AS200 Slim as a comparatively slimline version pitched as being a perfect fit for those with a little less studio space to spare or more restricted access for installation, British boutique electronic instruments innovator Analogue Solutions is proud to announce availability of Colossus AS250 Quartz as a range of add-on expanders — effectively ‘splitting’ Colossus AS200 Slim into ‘quarters’ to enhance existing Colossus systems or other modular synthesisers while also allowing for piecemeal purchase benefitting those wishing to build a complete Colossus system over time to spread the cost — as of May 2…

As a range of add-on synth expanders, each Colossus AS250 Quartz ‘quarter’ has a specific set of general features and is named accordingly: AS250-VCO — comprising a bank of 12 voltage-controlled oscillators (OSCILLATOR 1 through to OSCILLATOR 12), plus two noise generators (NOISE GENERATOR 1 and NOISE GENERATOR 2), RANDOM VOLTAGE GENERATOR, SAMPLE AND HOLD, and a 31 x 15 ANALOGUE PIN MATRIX ROUTING panel; AS250-Scope — comprising four discrete voltage-controlled amplifiers (VCA 1 through to VCA 4), four envelopes (ENVELOPE SHAPER 1 through to ENVELOPE SHAPER 4), two low frequency oscillators (LFO 1 and LFO 2), LCD (Liquid Crystal Display) OSCILLOSCOPE as standard or CRT (Cathode Ray Tube) OSCILLOSCOPE optionally available, and TOUCH KEYBOARD CONTROL / SEQUENCER; AS250-VCF — comprising eight voltage-controlled filters (with FILTER 1 through to FILTER 4 each of a SEM-type 12dB multimode design and FILTER 5 through to FILTER 8 each of a Moog-type 24dB low-pass design) with an associated VCA each, four envelopes (ENVELOPE SHAPER 1 through to ENVELOPE SHAPER 4), two spring reverbs (REVERBERATIONS 1 and REVERBERATIONS 2) with three real mechanical springs each, two RING MODULATORS, two SLEW LIMITERS, and a 31 x 15 ANALOGUE PIN MATRIX ROUTING panel; and AS250-Seq — comprising a 64-step analogue SEQUENCER (capable of operating in four different playback modes), four backlit moving-coil SIGNAL METERS, two JOYSTICKS, two MULTIPLES, MAIN MIXER, and two SUB MIXERS.

Modular by nature, it goes without saying, though, that each expander in the Colossus AS250 Quartz range features extensive patching capabilities with almost all parameters connectable via dedicated 3.5mm jack sockets, which when used in combination with those 31 x 15 ANALOGUE PIN MATRIX ROUTING panels — patch using (included) 3.5mm mono mini-jack leads to/from the synth circuits themselves to any matrix channels to be used, then patch using (included) red (10 kΩ) and black (0 Ω) pins accordingly — allow signals to be easily split and sent to multiple destinations with minimal cabling. “It is impossible to test every combination of patch,” proclaims Analogue Solutions Founder Tom Carpenter, before adding: “Some patches might produce unusual but still interesting results, or you could get something not mixing or buffering in quite the way you expect — just remember this is a living analogue synth, not a giant software controller that has clinical ‘perfection’.”

Put it this way: all voice and modulation circuits involved in Colossus construction are 100% analogue; in fact, Analogue Solutions steered purposefully away from digital technology to the extent of avoiding any MIDI (Musical Instrument Digital Interface) connections — those in need can, after all, always turn to third-party MIDI-to-CV boxes or Eurorack modules — though there are, of course, digital elements to the sequencer control involved in the aforesaid AS250-Seq expander that are unavoidable. As a brief aside, it is worth noting here that classic analogue sequencers like ARP’s advanced-for- its-time Model 1601 (launched in 1976) deployed digital logic chips while the colossal EMS Synthi 100 — itself inspiring Analogue Solutions’ Colossus concept from the get-go — even featured a digital sequencer that was truly ahead of its time.

Each expander in the Colossus AS250 Quartz range is — in keeping with that Colossus concept — large scale... think large knobs controlling metal shaft potentiometers, multi-turn vernier-VCOs, and panel-dominating pin matrixes constructed from eye-wateringly expensive Swiss-made broadcast-quality signal routers. Reality has it that the Colossus concept is a no-expense-spared super-synth. Indeed, it is fair to say that high-quality-constructed synthesisers such as the ‘complete’ Colossus AS100 Classic or Colossus AS200 Slim — also art and architecture incarnate, incorporating beautifully engraved wood cabinetry creating exquisite studio furniture in itself — only come around once in a decade, or, possibly, a generation. It is, of course, also fair to say that this comes at a cost. Thanks to the timely introduction of Colossus AS250 Quartz — effectively ‘splitting’ Colossus AS200 Slim into ‘quarters’ to create a range of add-on expanders enhancing existing Colossus systems or other modular synthesisers, piecemeal purchase benefitting those wishing to build a complete Colossus system over time to spread the cost is now an option.

Limited quantities of the Colossus AS250 Quartz expander range are available to order — priced (excluding VAT and delivery) at £6,900.00 GBP (AS250-VCO); £5,500.00 GBP (AS250-Scope); £6,900.00 GBP (AS250-VCF); and £5,500.00 GBP (AS250-Seq) — directly from Analogue Solutions’ dedicated webpage here: https://www.analoguesolutions.com/colossus-quartz"

Tuesday, January 31, 2023

Introducing The Pittsburgh Modular Taiga Paraphonic Synthesizer


video uploads by Pittsburgh Modular Synthesizers (click for additional posts)

Pittsburgh Modular Taiga: A Deeper Dive


Another Michael's One Minute Synthesis Minute


Pittsburgh Modular Taiga Talk with Richard and Michael


Additional user videos further below.



Taiga - Paraphonic Modular Synthesizer
New desktop synth from Pittsburgh Modular Synthesizers packs a powerful punch with 3 oscillators, wave folders, innovative vactrol-less dynamics, and more!

January 31st, 2023 - Pittsburgh, PA - Pittsburgh Modular Synthesizers today announced Taiga, a 3-oscillator paraphonic synthesizer.

Taiga is a powerful, complete, modern, and modular instrument that's a tour de force of the Pennsylvania based analog synth R&D team's recent inventions. Taiga wraps these new tools into a surprisingly accessible package that provides a massive pallet of 100% analog sounds to its users.

Taiga’s sound can be attributed to three uniquely Pittsburgh innovations. A trio of huge analog oscillators, the unmistakably smooth sound of the Pittsburgh Filter, and the warmth + punch of the unique Dynamics Controller. These enable you to not only create sounds that would be traditionally expected from an analog synthesizer but also to explore new sonic textures and performance possibilities.

Taiga oscillators
Waveforms generated by the three Taiga oscillators stretch beyond the basic geometric shapes and sounds associated with analog synthesis. Taiga waveforms pass through up to three proprietary, cascading waveshapers designed to precisely manipulate their symmetry and harmonic content. In addition, each oscillator includes a robust six-stage wave folder to add even more complexity and depth to the diverse sonic palate of Taiga.

The 'Pittsburgh Filter'
The Pittsburgh filter has defined the sound of Pittsburgh Modular from the moment it was introduced. A signature gummy and relaxed sound with no dead spots that has been tweaked to perfection. It offers a warm, smooth sweep through the full frequency range and a sweet resonance that does not roll off the low end. This generation of the Pittsburgh filter is specifically designed to ensure a remarkable interplay with Taiga’s oscillators.

Pittsburgh Dynamics Controller
Pittsburgh's new Dynamics technology imparts Taiga with a uniquely organic depth and presence. By simultaneously managing both amplitude and harmonic content, the Pittsburgh Dynamics Controller expands beyond the one-dimensional VCA found in other synthesizers. It does this by utilizing new advancements from traditional low pass gates to add additional definition and dimension to the voice of Taiga.

When used in low pass gate mode, sounds shed harmonic content and become warmer as they decrease in volume. This mimics how sound waves react to their environment. Because of this connection, the Taiga sounds more natural or complex compared to other instruments.

Echos, Mixer, MIDI, and much more
Pulling no punches in rounding out Taiga’s capabilities, Pittsburgh has included MIDI to CV conversion, mixer, preamp with soft clipping overdrive limiter circuit, analog bucket brigade delay, dual envelope generators, digital multi-modulation tool, LFO, noise generator, clock-synced arpeggiator, and an internal clock with tap tempo (can be externally synced too). You can use Taiga without patching or dive into its 60 patch points to use its components as separate modules with external devices or reroute its internal patching. The creative possibilities abound!

TAIGA Review // What if Bob Moog & Don Buchla collaborated on a synth in the 70s? // Tutorial

video upload by loopop

TIMELINE:
0:00 Intro
1:50 Overview
5:10 Oscillators
10:05 Sync
11:10 Glide
11:30 3 more LFOs
12:20 Mixer
13:00 Preamp
14:20 Mix/Split
15:00 Filter
18:30 Dynamics
21:55 Delay
22:45 Modulation
23:30 Ctrl module
23:55 Arp
25:25 Sequencer
25:45 Vel modes
27:40 CC modes
28:00 S&H
28:30 Pros & cons
31:40 Outro

Pittsburgh Modular TAIGA synthesizer REVIEW // 3 things I LOVE & 1 thing I DISLIKE
video upload by BoBeats

CONTENT:
00:00 What is the Taiga?
03:36 Part 1: OSCILLATORS explained
13:56 Design, Mixer, Preamp & a few other things
16:02 Part 2: FILTER module explained
21:05 Part 3: i don't like this...
25:15 A few more functions worth mentioning
26:35 Part 4: DYNAMICS module explained
30:47 Final Verdict: is it worth buying?

Pittsburgh Modular Taiga Review

video upload by

Index:
Intro - 0:00
Getting close up - 8:17 (this is longer than I thought, sorry)
Oscillators - 13:28
FM - 14:39
Waveforms - 15:20
Wave folding - 17:16
Tuning - detuning - 19:36
Make a bassline - 21:24
The Filter - 24:29
Dynamics - 27:22
Dynamics - VCA Mode - 27:43
Dynamics - LPG Mode - 28:31
Dynamics - LPG Mode + Pluck - 34:04
Summary so far - 35:58
Digital Control Section - ARP and stuff - 38:02
MIDI Vs Eurorack - 41:33
Sync - 46:19
Oscillator chords - 46:59
Preamp - 47:37
Separate oscillator sequencing - 48:54
2-note polyphony in Paraphonic Mode - 51:15
Conclusions - 53:02

Saturday, April 23, 2022

Offgrid Shuffle in Eurorack: LoFi Hiphop with Stolperbeats


video upload by Making Sound Machines

"Here's a modular lofi hiphop patch that came out so leftfield it was too fun not to share! It's built around #Stolperbeats and Befaco's fantastic Percall Quad Drum VCA, with Stolperbeats sequencing the shuffled gates and a wooden baseboard amplified and routed through our #TausenddB and #Multiplikand patched as a texture control.

Stolperbeats, 'beats tripping over themselves' in German, is our upcoming drum trigger sequencer designed to create shuffled beats influenced by artists like Flying Lotus, Hiatus Kaiyote and J Dilla. We really love those beats and used to reconstruct them for our tracks in the DAW, so we ended up digging deep into the techniques how real-life drummers like Questlove from The Roots or Perrin Moss from Hiatus Kaiyote play these shuffles.

This patch is almost a little hack as it uses Stolperbeats' clock outputs as a musical signal. Subdiv outputs the swung clock or a related set of tuplet subdivisions, perfect for syncing up cartesian sequencers like Make Noise Rene that advance one step per clock tick. Sync plays a straight unswung metronome ranging from once every four bars to 24 ppq, great for keeping a Delay or LFO in time.

Here, Stolperbeats' clock signals are patched to trigger Percall's VCA envelopes, shaping the sounds picked up from the board with piezo contact mics, and creating groove from the offset flams of the shuffled and straight clocks. Enrica is performing the drum rolls by changing the subdivisions on the fly. It's all held together by the lovely blips from Winterbloom 's Juno-inspired DCO Castor & Pollux on kick and a Patching Panda Hatz patch on snare duty.

We'll be showcasing this setup tonight at Muelheim Modular's lovely synth shop in Köln Mülheim. It's part of Mülheimer Nacht 2022 so if you're in Cologne, swing by and say hi! You will be able to try out the patches and modules hands-on. If you want to build our synth #DIY kits, we're hosting a workshop at Superbooth in Berlin, 13.05.2022, 17:00. If you are unable to make it to Berlin, kits are available at Muelheim Modular and Exploding Shed (EU), Thonk (UK) and dsp.coffee (US), or visit our website and mail us directly."

Wednesday, August 18, 2021

Leaf Audio Drone Synth Re-vived


video upload by TheLeafAudio

"We re-vived an old friend, the Drone Synth in a beautiful wood-case! Available as a DIY kit only. A classic 4-OSC Drone Synth with OSC-Sync. 2 Channels with 2 OSC each, Mixing Circuit leading into a 2-Chn. Tilt-EQ (combined Hi- and Lo-Shelf). The VCA features a CV-In, Pitch is controllable manually only. Available again from september 2021 via Exploding Shed."

Drone Synth & DFAM Demo

video upload by

Tuesday, August 10, 2021

Analog Mafia RC-808 “Drum Rap” Contest

The following is in via Analog Mafia. You can find details on the contest here.

"RC-808 is a drum synth that can do the rap all by itself. In another words, we will go back to the days of the talking drums. It would be great if you could have a listen to the files.

Giving articulation ability to drum sequencers was actually a part of the Roland history ever since Don Lewis connected an expression pedal to add volume level accent to give variation to a primitive preset patterned rhythm box. This lead Mr Kakehashi to implement "Accent" as a parameter of rhythm machines.

When Mr Kikumoto designed programmable drum sequencers and MIDI protocols, he wondered why the sequencers onboard drum machines don't have any pitch nor duration parameters. Because they are non-tuned percussion? But then synths can provide frequency and envelope curves to match your needs and tastes. Isn't this lack of these parameters result of prejudices or stereo types that still confines the drum sound expressions to a certain notion only?

This is the reason why the RC-808 Standalone edition has a small piano roll style sequencer. With full fledged general purpose 8 partial synth engines per instruments, you can create both tuned and sustained sounds that can be used for percussive purposes. For instance, this offers "open and close" sound variation to not just hi-hats but to any other instrument you can imagine, like "open and close bass drum" you hear on the demo files here.

Recently, as Kikumoto san was reviewing HipHop and Rap music, he found rappers' rhyme and flow concept somewhat resembling his RC-808 concept of providing further expression to drum sounds.

Inspired with the rhyme and flow concept, he is thinking of expanding this scheme to shed new light to drum sound expression, not just to hiphop and rap, but to all kinds of music genre, with a concept of Drum Rap like MC talking drum so to say."

https://rc-808.com/event-en/

Saturday, June 26, 2021

EMS Founder Peter Zinovieff Has Passed Away



Update: Image of Peter Zinovieff (previously in via Brian Kehew).

"Circa 1975: A photo from the Frankfurt Music Fair

Peter Zinovieff in the EMS synthesizer booth.

They are featuring the rare SYNTHI P model, just announced on the left side and stand. Underneath the board listing EMS musical artists is a SYNTHI HI-FLI effects unit is barely seen. Another unusual/prototype model is next to the Hi-Fli."


Peter Zinovieff and Electronic Music Studios video upload by JeffreyPlaide


Peter Zinovieff: Synth Pioneer video upload by Sound On Sound magazine Jul 21, 2016


Peter Zinovieff talks about modern musical interfaces video upload by Expressive E Jan 6, 2016


Peter Zinovieff feature uploaded by Erica Synths on Nov 23, 2020. This was the latest video to feature Peter Zinovieff that I am aware of.


Peter Zinovieff interview 2015 video upload by 香港電子音樂社 Hong Kong Electronic Music Society Jun 30, 2015


Dr Peter Zinovieff intro & performance excerpt - Deliaphonic 2017 video upload by Deliaphonic Aug 29, 2018

And a few perspectives from others:

Bright Sparks Behind The Scenes - The Brits video by GForce Software published Feb 16, 2021

Cosmic Tape Music Club Podcast hosted by The Galaxy Electric - E1 Peter Zinovieff

video by The Galaxy Electric published Jan 27, 2021

Peter Zinovieff Electronic Calendar

video by Mark Jenkins published Dec 9, 2019 - Electronic Calendar available through this post.

You can find a history of posts mentioning Peter Zinovieff here.



via The Guardian

"Peter Zinovieff, a hugely influential figure in British music whose early synthesisers helped to change the sound of pop, has died aged 88. He had suffered a fall at home earlier this month.

With its marketing slogan 'think of a sound – now make it', his company Electronic Music Studios (EMS) was one of the first to bring synthesisers out of studios and to the public. With products such as the portable VCS3 and Synthi A, EMS customers – including David Bowie, Kraftwerk, the Who, Tangerine Dream and Pink Floyd – were often taught to use the instruments by Zinovieff.

In 1967 he collaborated with Paul McCartney on Carnival of Light, a performance of a 14-minute avant garde composition created between Beatles sessions for Penny Lane that has never been released.

He was also a respected composer of his own work, including early experiments with AI composition and sampling – he claimed to have invented the latter technique." You can read the full post here.



via Wikipedia:

"Peter Zinovieff (26 January 1933 – 23 June 2021) was a British engineer and composer, whose EMS company made the VCS3 synthesizer in the late 1960s. The synthesizer was used by many early progressive rock bands such as Pink Floyd[3] and White Noise, and Krautrock groups[4] as well as more pop-oriented artists, including Todd Rundgren and David Bowie. In later life he worked primarily as a composer of electronic music.

Zinovieff was born on 26 January 1933;[5] his parents, Leo Zinovieff and Sofka, née Princess Sophia Dolgorouky, were both Russian aristocrats, who met in London after their families had emigrated to escape the Russian Revolution and soon divorced.[6] During World War II he and his brother Ian lived with their grandparents in Guildford and then with their father in Sussex. He attended Guildford Royal Grammar School, Gordonstoun School and Oxford University, where he earned a doctorate in geology.[7][8]

Zinovieff's work followed research at Bell Labs by Max Mathews and Jean-Claude Risset, and an MIT thesis (1963) by David Alan Luce.[9] In 1966–67, Zinovieff, Delia Derbyshire and Brian Hodgson ran Unit Delta Plus, an organisation to create and promote electronic music. It was based in the studio Zinovieff had built, in a shed at his house in Putney. (The house is near the Thames, and the studio was later partially destroyed by a flood).[10][11] EMS grew out of MUSYS, which was a performance controller operating as an analogue-digital hybrid.[12] It was a synthesiser system which Zinovieff developed with the help of David Cockerell and Peter Grogono, and used two DEC PDP-8 minicomputers and a piano keyboard.[13] Unit Delta Plus ran a concert of electronic music at the Watermill Theatre in 1966, with a light show. In early 1967 they performed in concerts at The Roundhouse, at which the Carnival of Light was also played; they split up later in 1967.[11] Paul McCartney had visited the studio, but Zinovieff had little interest in popular music.[14]

In 1968, part of the studio was recreated at Connaught Hall, for a performance of pieces by Justin Connolly and David Lumsdaine.[15] At the IFIP congress that year, the composition ZASP by Zinovieff with Alan Sutcliffe took second prize in a contest, behind a piece by Iannis Xenakis.[16]

In 1969, Zinovieff sought financing through an ad in The Times but received only one response, £50 on the mistaken premise it was the price of a synthesiser. Instead he formed EMS with Cockerell and Tristram Cary.[17] At the end of the 1960s, EMS Ltd. was one of four companies offering commercial synthesizers, the others being ARP, Buchla, and Moog.[18] In the 1970s Zinovieff became interested in the video synthesizer developed by Robert Monkhouse, and EMS produced it as the Spectron.[19]

Jon Lord of Deep Purple described Zinovieff as "a mad professor type": "I was ushered into his workshop and he was in there talking to a computer, trying to get it to answer back".[20] Trevor Pinch and Frank Trocco, in their history of the synthesizer revolution, see him rather as aristocratically averse to "trade".[21]

Zinovieff wrote the libretto for Harrison Birtwistle's opera The Mask of Orpheus,[22] and also the words for Nenia: The Death of Orpheus (1970).[23] The section Tristan's Folly in Tristan (1975) by Hans Werner Henze included a tape by Zinovieff."

Update:

Peter Zinovieff: A Tribute by CatSynth TV

video upload by CatSynth TV

"We look back at the life and work of Peter Zinovieff, who passed away last week at the age of 88. His work at Electronic Music Studios (EMS) was a major influence on musicians of the 1970s and beyond. At EMS, he co-created the well-known and coveted VCS3 and Synthi series. But he was also a composer in his own right, working on pioneering electronic music in the 1960s and returning to active composition in the 2010s with several collaborations with artists in other media and exploring massive sound spatialization.

Additional background music provided via the Arturia Synthi V as a tribute."

You can find additional posts featuring Peter Zinovieff here.

Tuesday, March 30, 2021

Cosmic Tape Music Club Podcast hosted by The Galaxy Electric - E3 Wendy Carlos


video by The Galaxy Electric

New podcast from supporting members, The Galaxy Electric.

Don't miss 14:05 on Wendy Carlos metting Bob Moog at the AES conference. You can explore more on her webiste here: http://www.wendycarlos.com.

"Thanks for joining us for Episode 3 of the Cosmic Tape Music Club monthly Podcast! Join your hosts Jacqueline and Augustus of the experimental pop band The Galaxy Electric as they get cosmic on the topic of Wendy Carlos. Wendy is a genius as well as the self proclaimed "Original Synth". She is a platinum selling artist, a Grammy winner, and an Ivy League school grad. We share all sorts of facts including winning a science fair by building a computer from scratch, melding the worlds of classical music and synthesizer, the Moog Modular, scoring for Kubrick, digital audio pioneering and much much more!

https://cosmictapemusicclub.podbean.com/https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast...​

Chapters:
Intro 00:00​
Early Beginnings 2:09​
College 6:55​
SOB 11:24​
AES Conference Moog sighting 14:05​
Rachel Elkind 19:39​
Clockwork 26:35​
Gonna let it Shine 29:40​
Tron 31:27​
Inspiration to Tomita 36:51​
Stevie Wonder popped by 38:50​
Vocoder your Moroder 39:47​
microtuning 42:48​
Digital is King 46:16​
Sticky Shed 48:26​
Astrophotographer 53:59​
Outro 59:38​"

Thursday, December 10, 2020

Anvil Synthesizers "The Anvil" Digital Percussion Synthesizer Ad



This one is via @mu_zines

"The Anvil" was featured in this post from 2014. Muzines, an online repository of music magazines, posted an article on The Anvil here. The question though, is did any of these ever get produced? If you know, feel free to leave a comment. The advert to the left implies they were taking orders at some point they were selling off their IP. Interesting bit of synth history. One of those mystery synths no one knows what happened to...

Update: note the address in the print is 29 Chowmley Gardens, Aldred Road, London NW6. Someone mentioned it could be Cholmley Gardens, pictured. A search on Chowmley gets redirected to Cholmley, so this is likely. Interesting to see where it could have all happened. I used to walk by Serge's shop in Hollywood, none the wiser, when I was a kid. I do remember the wig shop. :)

Update2: interesting side note from Rob Walker: "Reading the in depth article linked to, one of the designers was Roy Gwinn who is known for his Guitar Effects pedal design which Chris Carter adapted into the Gristleizer. I sold Roy a Doepfer Euro case a couple of years back, I’ve asked if he can shed any light."

Update3: via the comments below: "The story of the Anvil Percussion Synth is in RHYTHM MACHINES 2: The 1980s Drum Computers - By Alex Graham. It's available on Amazon (the book, not the Anvil)." [on Amazon here]

Update4: From Roy Gwinn: 'No, the Anvil was never finished. I underestimated the time to do the software, and the hardware was a bit iffy when it got hot. All fixable, but we ran out of money.'

Thursday, April 30, 2020

Molten Music Monthly - April 2020 - Superbooth Special


Published on Apr 30, 2020 Molten Music Technology

"It's been Superbooth 2020 Home Edition and there's too much stuff. Not all of it was new but we had unprecedented detail in awesome live streams about a load of modules and synth. Including my own live stream interviews with synth related people who fascinate me. There are lots to get through and this is just the stuff that I liked in particular - there are loads of things I didn't have space for.

Erica Synths goes nuclear, ST Modular releases 1000 DIY modules, Ritual Modular gets into 1U, 1010music gives us a mini sampler, Befaco does a mini VCMC, Expert Sleepers gives us double the trouble, Bastl loops MIDI, Liquid Foam is a very cool box, Tangible Waves lets us all build modules, Strokes 2 is a mad software groove machine, TiNRS has a Covid kick drum module, Future Sound Systems has a complex VCO, Noodlebox is a thing, Critter and Guitaris does video, There's a whole synth in KOSMO format, Elk Audio OS does something interesting, and there's a shed load of stereo filters. But first, Distrokid.

Intro - 0:14
Distokid - 2:25
Erica Synths Fusion II - 6:11
ST Modular - 9.51
Ritual Electronics - 11:51
1010music - 13:15
Befaco CV Thing - 15:18
Expert Sleepers Disting EX - 17:46
Bastl Instruments MIDI Looper - 20:07
Herbs and Stones Liquid Foam - 22:31
Tangible Waves DIY - 24:01
Strokes 2.0 - 25:58
TiNRS Circular Thing - 27:17
Future Sound Systems Recombination Engine - 29:04
64 Pixels Noodlebox - 30:23
Critter & Guitari - 31:42
ELK Audio OS Blackboard - 33:25
Look Mum No Computer Kosmo - 37:44
Stereo Filter Bonanza - 40:07
Finishing off and coming soon - 44:40"

Saturday, February 22, 2020

Folktek Impossible Box rare big modular synth art thing by Arius Blaze

Note: Auction links are affiliate links for which the site may be compensated.


via this auction

Original offered by Folktek for $1 million dollars. It went up for auction in 2013 and reached $39,100 with 55 bids at the time of this post. You can find previous posts featuring the Folktek Impossible Box including some demos here.

Thursday, August 08, 2019

Analogue Solutions Impulse Command & Fusebox x 2 New Toys!!!


Published on Aug 8, 2019 Sounds From The Shed

"These just arrived this morning, just finishing setting them up and hope to have something musical put out by tomorrow evening or Saturday at the latest :)
I'd parted with quite a bit of AS gear and really regretted it so am rebuilding :) All synth sounds are AS Telemark."

Update:

Impulse Command and Wine

Published on Aug 8, 2019 Sounds From The Shed

"This may or may not be tuneful, but it was a sunny day in Northern Ireland I had a few beverages and played about in the Shed with the new toys and came up with this. I'll give it a more detailed examination when I'm thinking straighter :)

It's a brief play about with the IC being modulated and transposed by the Generator sequencer."

Tuesday, July 23, 2019

MOOG ONE - 3 SEQUENCERS, 3 SYNTHS


Published on Jul 23, 2019 Sounds From The Shed

"In one I use the Moog ones ability to run 3 different sequencers on different voices and different clock divisions. It's a HUGE! synth. Video images don't do its size justice."

Monday, May 06, 2019

Behringher MS-101 Sequencer & Sound Exploration


Published on May 6, 2019 Sounds From The Shed

"I played in a short sequence then just tweaked and modified the sound and sequence. Got carried away and ended up with this loooong video :)"

Update:

Behringher MS-101 Source Mixer and FM Modulation

Published on May 6, 2019 Sounds From The Shed

"Just a short loop playing while I make changes to the sound parameters to show the various possibilities of the Synth"

Wednesday, December 12, 2018

Severely Weathered / Neglected Waldorf Q, Alesis Andromeda A6, & Ensoniq Fizmo

Note: Auction links are affiliate links for which the site may be compensated.

Waldorf Q via this auction

Alesis Andromeda via this auction

Ensoniq Fizmo via this auction

No mention what happened to them, but if I had to guess on the Waldorf Q, the Nextel paint got sticky and someone attempted the talcum powder fix. Apparently you can coat stick plastics with talcum power and then give them a light wipe to clean any excess off. The silo knobs likely broke apart, which actually happened to me on my XTk as you can see here.

That said it looks like a job gone horribly wrong. I was going to say the A6 and Fizmo faired better, but check out the cigarette stains on the keys, dirt on the surface, and missing knobs. They look like they've been stored in an outdoor shed. The listings state they are estate sales. There are other synths listed including an EMU PK-6 Proteus keyboard, XK-6 Extreme Keys, Proteus 2000 rack synth, and two Yamaha EX5s. On the non synth front there's a Porsche steering wheel for anyone interested! Click on "See other items" to right of the seller's name after click any of the three auction links above.

Sunday, November 25, 2018

Polymath and Generator - Making a Synth Pop Bass & Arp Sequence


Published on Nov 25, 2018 Sounds From The Shed

"Making nice Synth Pop Arp and Bass with the Polymaths along with modulation from the Generator Sequencers"

Monday, November 19, 2018

Analogue Solutions - Syntherapy


Published on Nov 19, 2018 Sounds From The Shed

"This is an uptempo/upbeat song with an 80's synth feel to it.
Played it live using Generator Sequencers and the Leipzig Sk for the lead. Also features Polymath, Fusebox, Telemark and Nyborg 24's"

Some Tom and Jerry for you.

Sunday, November 18, 2018

Analogue Solutions Polymath - Ode to Rat...


Published on Nov 18, 2018 Sounds From The Shed

"An Ode to the Ninja like Rat in my house that has courageously evaded capture on numerous occasions."

See the synth rats label below for more.
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